THE GLOBAL FUND TO FIGHT AIDS, TUBERCULOSIS, AND MALARIA:

A SMART, LIFESAVING U.S. INVESTMENT

Rosemary Wanjiru gives general health education to patients at the Kayole II Sub-County Hospital waiting bay. Photo credit: The Global Fund

THE GLOBAL FUND TO FIGHT AIDS, TUBERCULOSIS, AND MALARIA:

  • Is the world’s largest global health funder
  • Invests more than $4 billion a year in programs run by local experts and governments
  • Builds stronger health systems, health security and pandemic preparedness
  • Accelerates the end of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases

Community health worker Nombasa and her husband in South Africa. Photo credit: The Global Fund

SINCE THE GLOBAL FUND WAS FOUNDED IN 2002: OVER 38 MILLION LIVES SAVED

61% decline in AIDS-related annual deaths

Nearly 50% decline in malaria-related annual deaths

25% decline in TB-related deaths

*in countries where the Global Fund invests

Pytaeavy is a local Village Malaria Worker in Cambodia. Photo credit: The Global Fund

RESULTS-ORIENTED, ACCOUNTABLE MODEL FOR ASSISTANCE

The Global Fund is a uniquely efficient development financing agency, with a strong focus on results, accountability and oversight.

The Global Fund places a premium on accountability. It has a rigorous, evidence-based grant application process and provides three-year grants to governments and local entities, including many faith-based organizations. It then holds partners accountable for delivering.

The Global Fund Data Governance Committee meets. Photo credit: The Global Fund

IN 2019, 45 COUNTRIES INCREASED THEIR INVESTMENT
Group 3 U.S. investments 33% 67% International investments
IN 2019, 45 COUNTRIES INCREASED THEIR INVESTMENT

CATALYZING OTHER DONOR AND DOMESTIC INVESTMENTS

By law, the U.S. can only cover up to 33 percent of the Global Fund’s total budget, requiring other donors to step up. During the last pledging cycle in 2019, other donors significantly increased their contributions.

U.S. investments through the Global Fund also encourage the countries fighting the diseases to increase their own investments in health.

Global Fund co-financing requirements catalyze domestic investments, with grant recipients committing 41 percent more of their own funding to fight AIDS, TB and malaria for 2018–2020 compared to 2015–2017.

Click & Drag into the Global Fund
The Global Fund

WE NEED CONTINUED U.S. LEADERSHIP TO END THE AIDS, TB AND MALARIA EPIDEMICS

In 2019, the whole world stepped up, pledging $14 billion for the Global Fund’s hugely successful sixth Replenishment – an unprecedented 15 percent increase over the previous fundraising cycle. U.S. leadership was instrumental, encouraging other donors to increase their contributions and get the world back on track to end AIDS, TB and malaria.

Maintaining a $1.56 billion appropriation for fiscal year 2022 would equal a $4.68 billion U.S. contribution over the three-year Replenishment cycle and ensure that other donors follow through on their commitments.

Community health worker Carolina Livas Tembe does door-to-door check-ins in Mozambique. Photo credit: The Global Fund

COMBINED WITH A PLANNED INCREASE IN DOMESTIC RESOURCES, $14 BILLION FOR THE GLOBAL FUND WILL:

  • Save an additional 16 million lives.
  • Reduce the number of projected AIDS, TB and malaria deaths by nearly 50 percent.
  • Avert 234 million infections or disease cases.
  • Spur $19 in economic returns and health gains for every $1 invested.

U.S. support for the Global Fund is part of overall U.S. international assistance appropriations. To adequately fund the Global Fund, we need an increase in the broader international development budget—a critical investment in U.S. humanitarian, economic and security goals with a history of strong bipartisan support.

Naw Htay Htay Myint, a community mobilizer, supervises and checks-in on a community malaria volunteer in Myanmar. Photo credit: The Global Fund

What $1.56 Billion Buys

Reveal All

U.S. LEADERSHIP TO ADVANCE HUMAN RIGHTS AND EQUALITY

Dr. Anthony Fauci

For decades, American leaders across party lines--from President George W. Bush to President Joe Biden--have agreed that it is our moral responsibility to end preventable, treatable diseases that disportionately impact the poorest and most vulnerable communities around the world.

Dr. John Nkengasong

The fight to end the AIDS, TB and malaria epidemics is a fight for equality. Around the world, stigma, discrimination and gender inequality continue to limit access to HIV and TB prevention and treatment services. For example, in sub-Saharan Africa, five in six new infections among adolescents aged 15-19 are among girls.

From its founding the Global Fund has made gender equality and human rights-based programming a priority, with attention to services for key populations–people who are vulnerable to diseases due to poverty, ostracization, discrimination and criminalization, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, trans people, migrants and prisoners.

5-in-6 new HIV/TB infections aged 15-19 are among girls
Group 2 Group 2 Group 2 Group 2 Group 2 Group

GENUINE HEALTH SECURITY

U.S. investments in the global fight to end AIDS, TB and malaria help prepare the world to identify and respond to emerging pandemics.

Click on a program ring to see what infrastructure it supports.

Hover over a program ring to see what infrastructure it supports.

We cannot protect against new infectious disease threats if we step back in our efforts to end long-standing pandemics including AIDS, TB and malaria. To ensure genuine health security globally, low- and middle-income countries need the public health infrastructure and resources to fully address existing and emerging pandemics.

The infrastructure we need to combat new threats is built in part through what we use now to fight existing disease, including laboratories, supply chains, community health workers and disease surveillance systems. These networks are most effective when they are permanent and are not started from scratch when a new pandemic emerges.

For many Global Fund supported countries, the infrastructure put in place to fight HIV, TB and malaria has been the essential foundation of the COVID-19 response. For example, molecular diagnostic instruments used for TB and HIV testing are now being used to test COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries. Over one-third of the Global Fund’s work to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria also supports health security.

HOW THE GLOBAL FUND HELPS COUNTRIES RESPOND TO COVID-19

The Global Fund is working with partners to purchase and supply COVID-19 tests

It strengthens local health systems so they can test, track and treat COVID-19 now, including treating patients using oxygen, monoclonal antibodies and dexamethasone

It provides local health workers with personal protective equipment; and adapts critical HIV, TB and malaria programs so they can safely operate during COVID-19

COVID-19 THREATENS TO REVERSE PROGRESS ON…

Global Progress and Projections for HIV

New Cases of HIV per 1,000 people

Global Progress and Projections for Malaria

New Cases of Malaria per 1,000 people

Global Progress and Projections for Tuberculosis

New Cases of Tuberculosis per 1,000 people

Source: Gates Foundation

THE GLOBAL FUND IS SUPPORTING MORE THAN 100 COUNTRIES AS THEY CONFRONT COVID-19 AS PART OF ITS COVID-19 EMERGENCY RESPONSE MECHANISM

Learn how COVID-19 is affecting Africa's most populous country

Nigeria is Africa’s largest economy and most populous country, home to over 206 million people.

The pandemic is set to drive 16 million more people into poverty in Nigeria – where 44% of people will be below the international poverty line of $1.90 per day.

Learn more about the Global Fund’s COVID-19 response in Nigeria.