The Global Fund Investment Case 2022

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74%

decline in AIDS-related
death rates since 2002

42%

decline in TB
death rates since 2002

47%

decline in malaria
death rates since 2002

44 millions lives saved

since the Global Fund partnership was founded in 2002

But the fight is
far from over

For the first time since 2002, the fight against AIDS, TB and malaria has gone backwards. However, new innovations hold huge promise.

AIDS, TB and malaria are preventable and treatable diseases
that still kill more than 2.6 million people a year

In 2020, COVID-19 disrupted health programming in the most vulnerable populations.

It could have been even worse, but U.S. funding allowed the Global Fund to move with speed and scale to support the COVID-19 Response Mechanism, helping countries adapt their lifesaving programs by:

We can accelerate gains against AIDS, TB and malaria by delivering innovations around the world.

HIV

Long acting injectables for prevention and treatment

TB

Shorter-course therapy to improve access, equity and prevent drug resistant strains

Malaria

New prevention and treatment approaches on the horizon

Delivery

Multi-month medicines dispensing,
community delivery and tele-health

U.S. Leadership Is Critical to Get the Fight Against AIDS, TB and Malaria Back on Track.

The Global Fund determined that $18 billion is needed in the three year replenishment fundraising cycle to continue to scale up the technologies, health systems and community health workers that can not only fight AIDS, TB and malaria, but also prepare for future pandemics.

$18 billion for the Global Fund from around the world will:

Save 20 million lives between 2024 and 2026

Leverage $59 billion in domestic investments

Avert more than 450 million infections or cases

Spur $31 in economic returns and health gains for every $1 invested

Reinforce systems for health and pandemic preparedness by investing approximately $6 billion to:

Support health care workers

Strengthen labs, diagnostic tools, supply chain management, information and financial systems

Tackle antimicrobial resistance, including drug-resistant TB

Reinforce community systems

Accelerate the shift toward patient-centered, differentiated models of care

The U.S. Inspires Other Donors

During the last fundraising cycle, the U.S. commitment encouraged other donors to step up too.

Despite the devastating economic impact of COVID-19, impacted communities still increased domestic resources for AIDS, TB and malaria by 35 percent.

» Download a PDF Copy of the U.S. Investment Case for the Global Fund «

First photo: Nurse Mbayang Fall Bousso puts on protective gear at a clinic in Dakar, Senegal. The Global Fund/Ricci Shryock.
Second photo: A village malaria worker administers a malaria test to 4-year-old Nang Sievhong at his home in Cambodia. The Global Fund/John Rae.
Third photo: Students engage in the topic of self confidence during one of the “Keeping Girls in School” programs in South Africa. The Global Fund/ Karin Schermbrucker.

50 Million Reasons Why Support for the Global Fund Remains Bipartisan

In a rare moment of bipartisanship, Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA), Rep. Kay Granger (R-TX) and Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX) celebrate the Global Fund and the lifesaving impact of bipartisan U.S. leadership.